Willis Carto archive

Including information about his associates

How Willis Carto Plagiarizes

Willis Carto has a well-documented record of putting his name on things he has not written. But would he stoop so low as to plagiarize Ted O’Keefe, whom Carto has excoriated repeatedly in the pages of his tabloid, The Spotlight and elsewhere? We know that Carto steals from his friends, but it seems he also steals from his enemies.

Compare, for example, passages from “Leon Degrelle — Warrior for the West,” credited to Carto in his magazine, The Barnes Review (November/December 1998, pp. 5-11), with passages from an earlier work by Degrelle, which contains an introduction and afterword by Theodore J. O’Keefe (Epic: The Story of the Waffen SS, by Leon Degrelle. Newport Beach, CA: Institute for Historical Review. 1983. pp. 7-9, 68. ISBN: 0-939484-12-9.).

Not satisfied with plagiarizing O’Keefe, later in this same article, Carto refers to O’Keefe as an “assassin,” whose “treason” killed Leon Degrelle!

Ted O’Keefe’s original Willis Carto’s rendition

You are about to hear Leon Degrelle, who before the Second World War was Europe’s youngest political leader and the founder of the Rexist Party of Belgium. During that cataclysmic confrontation he was one of the greatest heroes on the Eastern Front. Of Leon Degrelle, Hitler said: “If I should have a son I would like him to be like Leon.”

As a statesman and a soldier he has known very closely Hitler, Mussolini, Churchill, Franco, Laval, Marshal Petain and all the European leaders during the enormous ideological and military clash that was World War Two. Alone among them, he has survived, remaining the number one witness of that historical period.

The life of Leon Degrelle began in 1906 in Bouillon, a small town in the Belgian Ardennes. His family was of French origin.

Before World War II, Degrelle had been Europe’s youngest political leader and the founder of the Rexist Party of Belgium. During the war he was a hero on the Eastern Front, fighting to save Europe from communism.

As statesman and soldier he was acquainted with Hitler, Mussolini, Churchill, Franco, Laval, Petain and many other European leaders during the titanic ideological and military clash that was World War II. Alone among them, he survived across nearly five decades to remain a personal witness of that historical period.

Degrelle was born to a family of French origin in the small Ardennes town of Bouillon in Luxembourg on June 15, 1906.

He studied at the University of Louvain, where he acquired a doctorate in law. He was — and is — also interested in other academic disciplines, such as political science, art, archeology and Tomistic philosophy.

As a student his natural gift of leadership became apparent. By the time he reached twenty he had already published five books and operated his own weekly newspaper.

Young Leon studied at the University of Louvain, where he acquired a doctorate in law, but he also immersed himself in other academic disciplines such as political science, art, archeology and philosophy. As a student, his natural gift of leadership became apparent. By the time he reached 20 the young prodigy had already published five books and operated his own weekly newspaper.

Out of his deep Christian conviction he joined Belgium’s Catholic Action movement and became one of its leaders.

But his passion has always been people.

He wanted to win the crowds, particularly the Marxist ones. He wanted them to share his ideals of social and spiritual change for society. He wanted to lift people up; to forge for them a stable, efficient and responsible state, a state backed by the good sense of people and for the sole benefit of the people.

Out of his deep Christian conviction, Degrelle joined Belgium’s Catholic Action Movement and naturally soon became one of its leaders. Leon’s passion was people. He wanted to win the crowds, particularly the Marxist ones. He wanted them to share his ideals of social and spiritual change for society. He wanted to lift people up; to forge for them a stable, efficient and responsible state, a state backed by the good sense of people and for the sole benefit of the people.

He addressed more than 2,000 meetings, always controversial. His books and newspaper were read everywhere because they always dealt with the real issues. Although not yet twenty-five, people listened to him avidly.

In a few short years he had won over a large part of the population.

During his involvement with the Rexist party, he addressed more than 2,000 meetings. His books and newspaper were read everywhere because they always dealt with the real issues. Although not yet 25, people listened to him avidly.

In a few short years he had won over a large part of the population.

On the twenty-fourth of May 1936 his Rexist Party won against the established parties a smashing electoral victory: Thirty-four house and senate seats. On May 24, 1936 Degrelle’s Rexist Party won a smashing electoral victory against the established parties by capturing 34 House and Senate seats.
The Europe of 1936 was still split into little countries, jealous of their pasts and closed to any contact with their neighbors. The Europe of Degrelle was still split into little countries, each jealous of its past glories and closed to any contact with neighboring peoples.

Leon Degrelle saw further. In his student days he had travelled across Latin America, the United States and Canada. He had visited North Africa, the Middle East and of course all of the European countries. He felt that Europe had a unique destiny and must unite.

Mussolini invited him to Rome. Churchill saw him in London and Hitler received him in Berlin.

Putting his political life on the line, he made desperate efforts to stop the railroading of Europe into another war. But old rivalries, petty hatreds and suspicion between the French and the German, were cleverly exploited. The established parties and the Communist Party worked on the same side: for war. For the Kremlin it was a unique opportunity to communize Europe after it had been bled white.

Thus, war started. First in Poland, then in Western Europe in 1940. This was to become the Second World War in 1941.

Soon the flag of the Swastika flew from the North Pole to the shores of Greece to the border of Spain.

But, even as he labored for the short-term integrity of Belgium’s borders, the far-sighted Degrelle was also looking toward the future of the continent. In his student days he had travelled across Latin America, the United States and Canada. He had visited North Africa, the Middle East and, of course, all of the European countries. He felt that Europe had a unique destiny and must unite behind its common cultural heritage.

Mussolini invited Degrelle to Rome. Churchill saw him in London, and Hitler received him in Berlin. Putting his political life on the line, he made desperate efforts to stop the railroading of Europe into another war. But old rivalries, petty hatreds and suspicion between the French and the Germans were cleverly exploited. The established parties and the Communist Party worked on the same side: for war. For the Kremlin it was a unique opportunity to communize Europe — after it first had been weakened and bled white.

Thus, war started. First in Poland, then in Western Europe in 1940. This was to become the World War II in 1941. Soon the flag of the Swastika flew from the Arctic Ocean to the shores of Greece to the border of Spain.

But the European civil war between England and Germany continued. And the rulers of Communism got ready to move in and pick up the pieces.

But Hitler beat them to it and invaded the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941. For Europe it was to be heads or tails; Hitler wins or Stalin wins.

But the European civil war continued. And the rulers of Communism got ready to move in and pick up the fractured pieces. Learning of Josef Stalin’s plan to invade the heart of Western Europe through Soviet occupied Poland and then Germany, Hitler beat him to the punch by launching a preemptive invasion of the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941. For Europe it was to be heads or tails; Hitler wins or Stalin wins.
It was then that from every country in Europe thousands of young men made up their minds that the destiny of their native country was at stake. They would volunteer their lives to fight communism and create a united Europe.

After the Germans began their assault against the bastion of international communism, from every country in Europe thousands of young men came forth, their minds resolved that the destiny of their native country was now at stake.

These men volunteered their lives to fight against the Soviets believing that, after first destroying the Bolshevik threat, they would work together to create a united Europe.

In all, they would grow to be more than 600,000 non-German Europeans fighting on the Eastern Front. They would bring scores of divisions to the Waffen SS.

The Waffen SS were ideological and military shock troops of Europe. The Germans, numbering 400,000 were actually in the minority.

Volunteers swelled the ranks of the Waffen SS, which grew to include almost 400,000 non-German Europeans fighting on the Eastern Front. Scores of new divisions were added to the Waffen SS order of battle. The German troops numbered 600,000.

The one million-strong Waffen SS represented the first truly European army to ever exist.

After the war each unit of this army was to provide their people with a political structure free of the petty nationalism of the past. All the SS fought the same struggle. All shared the same world view. All became comrades in arms.

Despite the past efforts of Napoleon, the one-million-strong Waffen SS represented the first truly pan-European army to ever exist. As envisioned, after the war each unit of this army was to provide their people with a political structure free of the petty nationalism of the past. All the SS fought the same struggle. All shared the same world view. All were comrades in arms and suffered the same wounds.
After joining as a private he earned all stripes from corporal to general for exceptional bravery in combat. He engaged in seventy-five hand-to-hand combat actions. He was wounded on numerous occasions. He was the recipient of the highest honors: The Ritterkreuz, the Oak Leaves, the Gold German Cross and numerous other decorations for outstanding valor under enemy fire. After joining as a private he earned all stripes from corporal to general for exceptional bravery in combat. He engaged in 75 hand-to-hand combat actions. He was wounded seven times. He was the recipient of the highest honors and was, quite notably, one of the first non-Germans to be awarded the coveted Oak Leaves to the Knights Cross of the Iron Cross, personally bestowed upon Degrelle by Hitler during a ceremony held in Berlin on August 27, 1944.
Not long ago a visiting Belgian journalist asked him if he had any regrets about the war years. Leon Degrelle thought for a moment, and then gave his reply: “Only that we lost!" Once, when asked by a journalist if he had any regrets about World War II, Degrelle responded: “Only that we lost."